The Conference of INGOs website Human Rights and Business contains an important statement by the former Commissioner for Human Rights, the 70 Recommendations of the Committee of Ministers CM(2016)REC3, the Side Event of the Human Rights, Co-development and Migrations working group, piloted by EN-RE, and the ensuing recommendation CONF/PLE(2017)REC2.

Apart from the other links at the bottom of the page, under INGO and NGO expertise, there is a link to the Guide for small and medium sized enterprises in English and French. This guide, available from Global SCR's website  in 23 European languages + Chinese and Japanese alerts the reader to practical cases of human rights infringements. Between 2014 and 2019 24 of these 25 language versions disappeared from an EU website but since they will not be uploaded again they have been made available to Global SCR, the original supplier to the EU, and EN-RE.

The other link is to the Business and Human Rights Research Centre BHRRC, a London based INGO, with its website in English, French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Arab, Portuguese and Russian. It then describes Human Rights issues by Companies, Countries and Topics. It also publishes a weekly summary in each of the above languages.

Precisely, the link Situation in Member States and other countries across the world, takes you directly to the Country page and to news items by company. Company non response means that BHRRC has asked for a statement on an issue but the company has not responded. So we can ask the company: Why not?

EN-RE is also installing this message in French and Spanish, two of EN-RE's four official languages, and we invite (I)NGOs from the other 22 languages to provide us with a similar introduction to this Human Rights and Business information, as in EN-RE's Spanish text (not an official Council of Europe language) so we can upload it on our website as well as it appearing on other websites.

The Corporate Social Responsibility Manager of a Madrid based Spanish multinational told me that they receive very little information from NGOs and it is very much appreciated because the more arguments they receive the easier it becomes for the CSR departments to advise their company management how to avoid human rights infringements which can both affect their reputation and cause production losses. This particular manager has told me I must contact the 125 companies quoted on the Madrid Stock Exchange.

Using the BHRRC weekly update in Spanish I contacted 4 Spanish multinationals mentioned in a report about Peru and must recontact these companies to check on the current situation.

By learning about human rights infringements in My Business and Human Rights and using the Conference of INGOs Human Rights and Business website and its links to BHRRC, you can take positive action to make the world a better place